Nursing Program

History

The College Nursing Program has a rich history and a reputation for quality nursing education and service to the community. As a result of the mergers of several hospitals over the last 25 years, there are six predecessor diploma schools of nursing with more than 4000 alumni and 100 plus years of nursing education. All alumni and nursing graduates are consolidated into the Trinity Nursing Alumni Association, an important source of support and advocacy for the College.

The initial feasibility study for the College and its related Associate and Baccalaureate Programs in Nursing was approved in July 1992 by the Illinois Department of Professional Regulation. The College has been authorized to operate and grant degrees by the Illinois Board of Higher Education since 1994. The College opened its nursing programs in the fall of 1994.
 

Philosophy

Faculty believe that nursing education should enable the student to acquire the knowledge and proficiencies necessary to practice culturally competent and congruent nu​rsing care and meet the changing needs of society. Faculty embrace, in particular, the overall tenets of culturally congruent nursing care set forth by Madeleine Leininger. Leinginer holds that care (caring) is the unifying and dominant essence of nursing.

Both faculty and students are responsible for educational outcomes. Faculty facilitates learning by designing learning methods and environments that are challenging and increasingly complex. Students are responsible for the quality and quantity of effort put forth in the educational endeavor. Learning can take place both in formal curriculum based experiences and “out-of-class” experiences such as College organizations. Students’ achieved outcomes constitute the criteria for success.

Faculty believe in education-based differentiated practice. Students' basic knowledge and skills at the Associate of Science level are built upon and expanded in the Bachelor of Science Program. The career-ladder approach to nursing education and practice is one valid choice for students and forms the basis for lifelong learning.
 

Learning Domains and Program Goals

The goals of the Associate of Science in Nursing (ASN) and the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) are organized according to the College domains of learning: knowledge, proficiency, and culture care values. All goals begin with knowledge attained from the nursing and general education courses. Knowledge, proficiency, and culture care values are integrated and dynamic.
 

Programs

The Department of Nursing offers two programs: an Associate of Science in Nursing and a Bachelor of Science in Nursing.
 

Associate of Science in Nursing Program Description

The Associate of Science in Nursing Program (ASN) is a two-year program of study combining didactic and clinical nursing courses as well as general education courses. The program prepares beginning nurses who function as providers and leaders of direct and indirect nursing care for diverse individuals, families, and groups. Graduates function as collaborative members within the discipline of nursing and the health care team. Graduates use basic knowledge of therapeutic nursing interventions, communication, culture, critical thinking, information technology, legal-ethical principles, and teaching-learning principles in their practice.
 
Graduates have an awareness and appreciation of research findings that contribute to nursing practice. The nursing curriculum incorporates primarily structured practice settings in acute, community, and long-term care. Graduates demonstrate accountability for nursing care given by self and/or delegated to others, and serve as advocates for client rights.
 
The program provides the basis for professional and personal development. The Associate of Science in Nursing degree program prepares graduates to assume responsibility for lifelong learning as an individual and as a member of the nursing profession. Graduates are prepared to practice in nurse generalist roles providing basic, safe, and effective nursing care. The program prepares graduates to continue their education at the baccalaureate in nursing level.
 
After completion of the program, the graduate is eligible to apply for the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) to qualify for practice as a Registered Nurse.

ASN Program Goals

Knowledge

  • Apply the theoretical concepts from a selected knowledge base of the natural and social sciences, humanities and nursing to provide holistic nursing care
  • Use teaching and learning principles to address needs/health problems of individuals, families, and groups
  • Demonstrate an awareness of and implement selected evidence-based nursing interventions
Proficiency
  • Use the nursing process to provide care for basic, common or complex needs/problems and to assist individuals, families and groups with health promotion, maintenance, and rehabilitation
  • Exhibit therapeutic and culturally sensitive interpersonal communication skills when addressing the needs/health problems of individuals, families, and groups and when interacting with health care team members
  • Participate as a member of the nursing and health care team in providing and managing proficient, safe, and effective direct and indirect nursing care, including the use of information technology
Culture Care Values
  • Demonstrate ability to provide culturally competent care by preserving/maintaining cultural identities and diverse lifeways of individuals, families, and groups
  • Practice nursing within the framework of the professional standards, values and codes, and legal and ethical considerations, including both the Illinois and Iowa Nursing Rules and Acts

 

ASN Admission Requirements

In addition to the general College admissions requirements students seeking entrance into the Associate of Science in Nursing program must have completed or earned the following:
 

  • High School Grade point average of 2.75 on a 4.0 scale
  • ACT minimum score of 21

 
Applicants who do not meet the above criteria are considered if they can show that they have accomplished 24 semester hours or more of college credit with a 2.75 GPA on a 4.0 scale.
 

Advanced Placement for Licensed Practical Nurses (LPN) Admission Policy

Advanced placement for LPNs in the Associate of Science in Nursing program is a selective process based upon an evaluation of previous academic and work experience, results of a placement exam and seat availability.
 

  • Applicants who answer 78% or more of the questions on the placement exam correctly are awarded 7 semester hours of credit for previous academic work in nursing and may enter the ASN Program in the second semester into NUR 100 (W), NUR 102, and NUR 212.
  • Applicants who answer less than 78% of the questions on the placement exam correctly must complete the application process for the ASN Program.

 
The placement exam is the National League for Nursing, Nursing Acceleration Challenge Exam (ACE) I: PN to RN. The placement exam is given in September for entry into the ASN Program in the spring semester.
 
LPNs complete all steps in the application procedure with the exception of submitting results of the ACT or SAT. Applicants must provide proof of the following:
 

  • Current unencumbered LPN licensure
  • Current LPN practice (practice as an LPN in the last two years or graduation from an LPN program within 6 months prior to starting the ASN program)
  • Minimum GPA of 2.75 on a 4.0 scale
  • General education courses consistent with the semester of placement with a C or better.
  • Placement exam results (which determine  the appropriate entry point in the curriculum)

 
The application deadline for LPN’s seeking advanced placement in the ASN Program is June 30th.
 

Math for Clinical Practice Requirement

All ASN nursing courses with a clinical component integrate math for medication administration. A math for medication administration test appropriate to the course and delineated in each course syllabus must be passed at a level of 78% or better in order to successfully complete the course.
 
Please note: Students intending to continue in the BSN program in the RN-BSN Completion option must fulfill the appropriate prerequisite math coursework to enable enrollment in a general statistics course.
 

ASN Test Average Policy

In the ASN Program, an overall test average of 78% or above must be achieved in each nursing course in order to successfully complete the course. Computation of the “test average” for a specific course will be described in the course syllabus and may include tests, quizzes, and exams. Courses may have additional grading requirements, which will be communicated in the course syllabus at the beginning of the course. Students who do not meet the 78% test and/or quiz average within a specific ASN course will be assigned a course grade of D or F based on the percentage grade attained for tests and/or quizzes. This grade will be assigned according to the Nursing Program Grading Scale on page 68 of this catalog.
 

ASN Program Progression

ASN students receiving a WF or grade below a C in a required nursing course will be prohibited from progressing in the ASN curriculum and will be withdrawn from the Nursing Program. Students must apply for readmission to the ASN Program for the following academic year. Readmission is not guaranteed. Students will be ranked by the ASN Selection Committee. Readmission will be based upon ranking and seat availability. Students wishing to be considered for readmission must complete the Request for Readmission form and a College application must be renewed. This process must be initiated by the student. It is the student’s responsibility to complete this process in order to be considered for readmission into the ASN Program, and a student will only be considered for one readmission into the ASN Program.
 
Any student receiving a WF or grade below a C in a nursing course who is re-admitted to the Nursing Program will be withdrawn from the Nursing Program with a subsequent WF or grade below a C. These students will not be eligible for readmission.
 

Standardized Assessment Test for ASN Graduation

A standardized nursing assessment test, the ATI Comprehensive Predictor, is a graduation requirement for the ASN degree. The ATI Comprehensive Predictor must be passed in order to graduate and, therefore, before taking the NCLEX-RN examination. If a student does not pass the ATI Comprehensive Predictor on the first attempt, he/she will be required to take the Virtual ATI (VATI). When the VATI proctor releases the student to take the NCLEX-RN, graduation requirements will be fulfilled. The minimum required score for passing is a 95% probability and is based on national norms. The assessment test is given before commencement in May.

Graduation Requirements for an ASN Degree

Requirements for an Associate of Science in Nursing Degree include meeting all of the following:
 

  • Fulfill the course requirements of the Associate of Science in Nursing curriculum
  • Complete the last 24 semester hours in  Nursing at the College
  • Earn a minimum of 68 hours of credit attaining a C (2.0) cumulative grade point average, which includes a C or above in each required nursing and general education course in the curriculum
  • Attain a passing score on the ATI Comprehensive Predictor
  • Meet all financial obligations incurred with the College
  • Be recommended by Faculty and approved by the College Governing Board for graduation

 
(No degree will be awarded until all requirements are met)
 
 

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN NURSING PROGRAM CURRICULUM PLAN


ASN ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN NURSING DEGREE
FALL SEMESTER
NUR101: The Art & Science of Nursing Practice # 8SH
Anatomy & Physiology I 2 4SH
Oral Communication 1,2 3 SH
Psychology 2 3 SH
TOTAL 18 SH
SPRING SEMESTER
NUR 102: Adult Health Nursing 9 SH
NUR 212: Pharmacology # 1 SH
Anatomy & Physiology II 2 4 SH
Growth & Development 2 3 SH
TOTAL 17 SH
SUMMER SESSION
Microbiology 2 4 SH
Written Communication 2 3 SH
TOTAL 7 SH
FALL SEMESTER
NUR 200: Human Disease Processes # 3 SH
NUR 201: Life Span Nursing I # 9 SH
Sociology 1,2 3 SH
TOTAL 15 SH
SPRING SEMESTER
NUR 203: Maternal-Newborn Nursing # 4 SH
NUR 202: Life Span Nursing II # 8 SH
Humanities Elective2 3 SH
TOTAL 15 SH

 
1 Indicates course may be chosen from among approved clusters listed in the academic section of the College Catalog
2 General education courses are taken at another institution or transferred into the nursing major, and may be completed prior to or concurrent with nursing courses listed
3# Denotes courses taken within the nursing department at Trinity College of Nursing & Health Sciences

 
Advanced Placement LPNs begin the curriculum in either the fall or spring semester of the first year based upon placement test scores. If receiving advanced placement as an LPN, students must take NUR 100(W); Math for clinical practice.

General Education Total 30 SH
Nursing Total 42 SH
ASN Program Total 72 SH
 

 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program Description

The Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program (BSN) offers three options for obtaining a BSN degree: The Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing option (BSN-A), the Basic Bachelor of Science in Nursing option (BSN-B), and the Bachelor of Science in Nursing Completion option (BSN-C).
 

BSN-A

The Accelerated BSN (BSN-A) option is a full-time course of study designed to enable students with a previous baccalaureate degree to earn a Bachelor of Science in Nursing. This is an intensive, fast-paced program, which builds upon previous education while providing the nursing art and science content in a 15-month program. The 15-month program combines both didactic and clinical nursing experiences.
 

BSN-B

The Basic Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN-B) option is a basic or generic option that allows a student who has completed all general education courses required in a baccalaureate nursing program to take the nursing courses for a baccalaureate nursing degree over six semesters. The basic program also combines both didactic and clinical nursing experiences.
 
Both the BSN-A and BSN-B program option allow the graduate to apply for the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) to qualify for practice as a Registered Nurse.
 

BSN-C

The BSN-C is an RN to BSN Completion program that provides advanced education for the graduate of an associate degree or diploma nursing program who has passed the NCLEX-RN and already has a nursing license. The two-year program of study combines didactic and preceptored clinical nursing courses and general education courses. Students may pursue the BSN-C in a full-time or part-time capacity.
 
BSN graduates demonstrate the knowledge, proficiency, and cultural competence of an educated person including the ability to synthesize general and professional education and experience. The Bachelor of Science in Nursing prepares professional nurses to function as providers, managers, and leaders of direct and indirect comprehensive care in a variety of health care settings. The care is provided for diverse individuals, families, groups, and communities. Graduates of the BSN program function as collaborative members within the discipline of nursing and the interdisciplinary health care team. Graduates of the BSN program critique research findings for evidence-based practice and are aware of current trends and issues facing nursing. Expanded knowledge of communication, culture, leadership, and management, critical thinking, therapeutic nursing and system interventions, legal-ethical and teaching-learning principles, standardized languages, and computer information are integrated into nursing practice. Education is emphasized as a major nursing function when providing/directing care for both health promotion and illness management. The BSN program further reinforces accountability for lifelong learning and professional career development.

Advanced Placement for Licensed Practical Nurses (LPN) Admission Policy
Advanced placement for LPNs in the Bachelor of Science in Nursing - Basic program is a selective process based upon an evaluation of previous academic and work experience and the results of a placement exam.
 
  • Applicants who answer 78% or more of the questions on the placement exam correctly are awarded 8 semester hours of credit for Nursing 101.
  • Applicants who score less than 78% on the placement exam must complete the application process for BSN-B Program and complete the entire BSN-B curriculum if accepted.
 
The placement exam is the National League for Nursing, Nursing Acceleration Challenge Exam (ACE) I: PN to RN. The placement exam is given in October for entry into the BSN-B Program in the following fall semester.
 
LPNs complete all steps in the application procedure with the exception of submitting results of the ACT or SAT. Applicants must provide proof of the following:
 
  • Current unencumbered LPN licensure
  • Current LPN practice (practice as an LPN in the last two years or graduation from an LPN program within 12 months prior to starting the BSN-B program)
  • Minimum GPA of 2.75 on a 4.0 scale
  • All general education courses completed with a C or better.
  • One general education course from the pre-requisite list may be taken during the first semester. This course may not include Anatomy & Physiology I, Anatomy & Physiology II, or Microbiology. These courses must be taken before admission to the program.
  • Placement exam results (which determine the appropriate entry point in the curriculum)
 
The application deadline for LPN’s seeking advanced placement in the BSN-B Program is September 1st.

BSN Program Goals

Knowledge

  • Synthesize knowledge from the natural and social sciences, humanities and nursing to provide and evaluate holistic nursing care
  • Integrate the nursing process to assist families, groups, and communities with a variety of complex and critical health needs and problems
  • Analyze the impact of past, current, and future trends and issues on the delivery of nursing care and health care organizations and systems
 

Proficiency

  • Incorporate evidence-based practice for delivering and evaluating nursing practice and outcomes
  • Collaborate as a member of the interdisciplinary health care team to manage comprehensive care for individuals, families, groups, and communities
  • Communicate professionally using interpersonal, oral and written skills
  • Evaluate health promotion, risk reduction, and disease prevention modalities for use in a variety of settings
 

Culture Care Values

  • Integrate cultural care values (preservation, accommodation, restructuring) when providing nursing care to individuals, families, groups, and communities
  • Evaluate nursing within the framework of regulatory and professional standards, values and codes
  • Integrate information technology into professional nursing practice

BSN Admission Policies

Accelerated BSN (BSN-A) Admission Policy:
Admission to the BSN-A option is highly selective and is based upon proven academic achievement attesting to the student’s ability to successfully complete an academically rigorous curriculum. In addition to the general College admissions requirements, students seeking entrance into the BSN-A program must meet the following criteria:
 
  • Hold a baccalaureate or higher degree in a non-nursing discipline
  • Minimum GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale
  • Completion of all required prerequisite general education courses with a grade of C or higher
  • Personal essay in a letter form addressing candidate’s professional attributes, ability to manage an accelerated curriculum and career goals
  • Required science courses must have been completed within the last seven years prior to enrollment
 
The BSN-A option student will be awarded 52 credit hours of advanced standing credit upon transcript evaluation of their non-nursing bachelor’s degree. In addition, the Registrar will evaluate the student transcript and complete a credit guide to formally approve the following specific courses that must be completed with a C or above.
 
  1. Anatomy and Physiology I
  2. Anatomy and Physiology II
  3. Microbiology
  4. Advanced Science
  5. Human Growth and Development
  6. Statistics
 
BSN-B Admission Policy:
In addition to the general college admission requirements, students seeking entrance into the BSN-B program must have met the following criteria:
 
  • Minimum GPA of 2.75 on a 4.0 scale
  • Completion of all required prerequisite general education courses with a grade of C or higher
 
The Registrar will evaluate the student transcript and complete a credit guide to formally approve the following specific courses that must be completed with a C or above. Science courses must be taken within the last 7 years prior to the date of enrollment in the program. One of the following courses may be taken in the first semester of the BSN-B program (with the exception of Anatomy and Physiology I or II or Microbiology) in order to be full-time.
 
Anatomy & Physiology I 4
Anatomy & Physiology II 4
Microbiology 4
Advanced Science 4
Psychology 3
Growth and Development 3
Sociology 3
Anthropology 3
Ethics 3
College Algebra 3
Statistics 3
English Comp. I 3
Oral Communication 3
English Comp. II 3
Humanities Electives X 2 6
Total General Education Credits 52
 
 
Note: BSN-B students must progress through the curriculum as prescribed. A student cannot change program “at will.” A change would necessitate reapplication with no guarantee of acceptance in the ASN Program. BSN-A and BSN-B students must complete the entire Bachelor of Science program of study before being eligible to apply for NCLEX-RN.
 
BSN-C Admission Policy:
The BSN-C policy will vary according to whether a student has a non-nursing bachelor’s degree. Below are the policies:
 
  1. BSN-C (for student without a non-nursing bachelor’s degree)
 
In addition to the general College admission requirements, students seeking entrance into the BSN-C program must have:
 
  • Proof of unencumbered licensure from a state board of nursing
  • Demonstration of organic chemistry and statistics readiness through testing and/or prior coursework.
  • Minimum GPA 2.75 on a 4.0 scale
 
Students with an associate degree or diploma in nursing who have been officially accepted into the RN-BSN Completion option are awarded 71 credit hours upon transcript evaluation for their basic RN program. If the student has taken any courses in the RN-BSN Completion curriculum, these courses will be credited on an individual basis.
 
  1. RN to BSN-C (with a non-nursing bachelor’s degree)
 
In addition to the general College admission requirements, students seeking entrance into the BSN-C program must have:
 
  • Proof of unencumbered licensure from a state board of nursing
  • Minimum GPA 2.75 or higher on a 4.0 scale
 
The RN-BSN Completion option student, who has already earned a non-nursing bachelor’s degree, will be awarded 71 credit hours upon transcript evaluation for their RN program. In addition, this student will be granted 12 credit hours of advanced standing upon transcript evaluation toward the BSN degree. These 12 credit hours will replace the general education courses of ethics, anthropology, advanced communication, and a humanities elective. There is no time limit on the acceptance of credits. The Registrar will evaluate student transcripts and complete a credit guide to formally approve the following specific courses that must be taken with a C or above:
 
  1. Advanced Science with a lab
  2. Statistics

Field Study Policy

In some courses, BSN students apply concepts from the course in a professional setting by interviewing people (who determine what hours will be available to the student), observing and discussing certain activities (which may occur at a time not controlled by the student), or developing, planning and/or implementing projects in the real work- world (which necessitate the student’s presence at certain times in certain places). Field study assignments are described by faculty but they differ from clinical/ lab assignments in that students:
 
  • determine how & where they will meet the course requirements
  • may be doing independent work without the direct supervision of a nurse
  • are not providing direct patient care

Program Progression BSN-A

Students must progress through the curriculum as prescribed in the Accelerated BSN curriculum option. Students receiving a WF or grade below a C in a nursing course will be prohibited from progressing in the Accelerated BSN curriculum. There is no part-time BSN-A option. Students who are unsuccessful in one course are eligible to either apply for readmission in the following curriculum cycle or apply for admission into the BSN-B option. Students who wish to transfer to the BSN-B option need to meet with the program coordinator and complete the “Request for Change in Program or Program Option.” Students who have been unsuccessful in more than one course will be withdrawn from the program. Neither readmission in the BSN-A option or admission in the BSN-B program option is guaranteed and is based on seat availability. A student will be considered for only one readmission.
 
It is the student’s responsibility to meet with the BSN Coordinator regarding curriculum options. If the student chooses the BSN-B option and is approved, an individual curriculum plan will be developed to integrate into the BSN-B curriculum.
 
Any student receiving a WF or grade below a C in a nursing course and retakes a nursing course will be withdrawn from the College if they subsequently achieve a WF or grade below a C.

Program Progression BSN-B

BSN-B students receiving a WF or grade below a C in a required course will be prohibited from progressing full-time in the BSN-B curriculum. The student who wishes to remain in the BSN-B program and take the courses that he/she is eligible (ie. Met pre-requisites) must meet with the program coordinator to complete the “Request for Change in Program or Program Option” and complete an individualized curriculum plan.
 
Any student receiving a WF or grade below a C in a nursing course who is re-admitted to the Nursing Program will be withdrawn from the Nursing Program with subsequent WF or grade below a C.
 
Any student receiving two grades of WF or two grades below a C (or any combination of the two) will be withdrawn from the BSN Program.

Program Progression BSN-C

This program is designed for the working RN. As such, the RN-BSN Completion curriculum plan allows flexibility in course progression, yet requires accountability of communication. The academic advisor will work with each student to develop an individualized plan to complete the curriculum. Once a student enters the RN-BSN Completion program, continuity of registration is expected. Continuity is defined as continuous enrollment in at least one nursing or general education course during the fall and spring semesters. Summer courses are offered in the BSN-C option, but summer enrollment is not required. If a student cannot maintain continuous enrollment, the student must contact the academic advisor and complete either a Leave of Absence or Withdrawal form. The Leave of Absence cannot exceed one academic year (two regular semesters, not counting summer term). Only two interruptions in the program of study are allowed during the BSN-C curriculum. It is the student’s responsibility to initiate the leave of absence. If a student does not either register for coursework or initiate a leave of absence, the student will be administratively withdrawn from the RN-BSN Completion program. The student can subsequently apply for readmission into the program but there is no guarantee of admission. Applicable forms and fees apply for readmission. A ten year maximum time limit from time of admission is set for program completion.
 
Students in the BSN program who do not successfully progress through the curriculum due to one nursing course may continue in the programs as long as the subsequent course’s pre-requisites have been met. Any student receiving a WF or grade below a C in two or more nursing courses will be withdrawn.

 

Test Average Policy

In the BSN-A and BSN-B program options, an overall test average of 78% or above must be achieved in each nursing course in order to successfully complete the course. Computation of the “test average” for a specific course will be described in the course syllabus and may include tests, quizzes, and final exams. Courses may have additional grading requirements, which will be communicated in the syllabus at the beginning of the course. Students who do not meet the 78% test/exams and/or quiz average within a specific course will be assigned a course grade of D or F based on the percentage grade attained for tests and/or quizzes. The grade will be assigned according to the Nursing Program Grading Scale described in the catalog.

Standardized Assessment Test Requirement For BSN-A & BSN-B

A standardized nursing assessment test, the ATI Comprehensive Predictor, must be passed as a requirement in order to graduate and, therefore, before taking the NCLEX-RN. The minimum required score for passing is at a 95% probability and is based on national norms. The assessment test is given in NUR A301 and NUR A420. The student will have two opportunities to pass the ATI. If a student does not pass on the second attempt, graduation will be delayed. The student will continue to work with a virtual ATI coach until “released” to take the NCLEX-RN. When the College receives notification of this “release”, the standardized nursing assessment requirement will be met.

Graduation Requirements for a BSN Degree

Requirements for a Bachelor of Science in Nursing Degree in the BSN-A option include meeting all of the following requirements:
 
  • Fulfill the course requirements for the Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing curriculum
  • Meet all 52 credits of pre-requisite general education requirements
  • Complete all nursing coursework at Trinity College of Nursing
  • Earn a minimum of 69 semester hours in nursing with a C (2.0) cumulative grade point average which includes a grade of C or above in each required nursing course
  • Meet all financial obligations incurred with the College
  • Attain a passing score on the standardized nursing assessment test
  • Be recommended by Faculty and approved by the College Governing Board to graduate
 
(No degree will be awarded until all requirements are met)
 
Requirements for a Bachelor of Science in Nursing Degree in the BSN-B option include meeting all of the following requirements:
 
  • Fulfill the course requirements of the BSN-B curriculum option of the Bachelor of Science in Nursing
  • Complete the last 35 semester hours of nursing at the College
  • Earn a minimum of 122 semester hours of credit attaining a C (2.0) cumulative grade point average which includes a C or above in each required nursing course and general education courses in the curriculum
  • Meet all financial obligations incurred with the College
  • Attain a passing score on the standardized nursing assessment test
  • Be recommended by Faculty and approved by the College Governing Board to graduate
 
Requirements for a Bachelor of Science in Nursing Degree in the BSN-C option include meeting all of the following requirements:
 
  • Fulfill the course requirements of the Baccalaureate of Science in Nursing curriculum
  • Complete the last 19 semester hours in Nursing at the College
  • Earn a minimum of 122 semester hours of credit attaining a C (2.0) cumulative grade point average which includes a C or above in each required nursing and general education courses in the curriculum
  • Meet all financial obligations incurred with the College
  • Be recommended by Faculty and approved by the College Governing Board to graduate

General Nursing Department Information Critical Objectives Policy

Critical objectives are objectives deemed to be of such importance to the practice of nursing that satisfactory performance in each objective must be maintained throughout the nursing program. An infraction of any critical objective may result in corrective action (see Corrective Action Policy). However, corrective action may vary according to the scope and seriousness of the behavior. Infractions may result in immediate failure of the course and/or dismissal from the College. If a student demonstrates behaviors that require corrective action within a course, the student must correct the behaviors in order to pass the course. Corrective action information may be communicated between faculty within the program to maintain consistency of behavior and monitor progress. Course-related corrective actions related to the course critical objectives should be carefully documented by faculty, shared with students and program coordinator/Dean (as applicable), and maintained in secure files in the office of the Dean of Nursing & Health Sciences.
 
Critical objectives are applicable while providing nursing care and when interacting with the health care team, clients, peers, faculty and others both in clinical and classroom situations. Critical objectives are listed under course outcomes in the syllabi. The expectation/outcome is that the student will demonstrate individual accountability for professional behavior.
 
To meet the critical objectives, the student will:
 
  • Follow dress code
  • Display professional attitude, actions, and respect when interacting with the client, family/significant others, health care team, peers, faculty, others
  • Act to preserve/maintain the cultural identities of others and accommodate/negotiate diverse lifeways
  • Practice within legal limits of nursing complying with established standards of care as defined in the Illinois and Iowa Nursing Acts and Rules, policies and procedures of the assigned health care organization and/or nursing unit, and recognized written standards of practice, including the health and safety requirements of the College for tuberculosis testing, CPR certification, immunizations, and OSHA and HIPAA training
  • Use principles of safety including practicing within the scope of skills and knowledge when implementing nursing care based upon the client’s physical and psychological condition, age, development level, and environment
  • Demonstrate emotional and physical stability when providing nursing care and when interacting with health care team, peers, faculty, and others
  • Use honest, accurate, objective verbal and written communication in reporting and recording nursing care, written assignments, and interacting with the health care team, clients, peers, faculty, and others
  • Demonstrate ethical behaviors in complying with the standards set forth in the American Nurses Association Code of Ethics by reflecting integrity and confidentiality at all times
  • Demonstrate accountability in attendance at clinical experience with punctuality, completion of commitments, and reporting of absences according to College policy as identified previously in this Catalog and individual course syllabus
  • Demonstrate timely preparation for the clinical experience in verbal and written communication and nursing care

Nursing Department Dress Code
In addition to strict adherence to the College dress code policy concerning name badges, grooming, and jewelry, students on clinical rotations must wear/carry:
 
  • the program uniform
  • a watch that displays seconds
  • a stethoscope
 
Nursing Department clinical attire is a pant uniform for males and a pant uniform or a maternity dress uniform if desired for females. A plain, white washable sweater, lab coat, or a short lab jacket with the College insignia sewn on the left sleeve two inches down from the shoulder seam may be worn with the uniform if needed. A white, non-regulation, maternity dress or pant uniform, identified with the College insignia, may be worn during pregnancy. White or neutral tone nylon hosiery is required with the dress uniform for female students. Male and female students are required to wear white or neutral tone hosiery/socks when in pant uniform. Shoes worn with the uniform must be all leather and all white. No clogs or open-toed shoes are allowed. The uniform is not to be worn away from the clinical setting unless special permission is given to wear the uniform to public events or to an external clinical experience.
 
Students in the BSN-C program option may, if they choose, wear a clean, white nursing uniform of their choice, with the College insignia sewn on the left sleeve two inches down from the shoulder seam. These students are expected to purchase the standard College lab coat described above.

Nursing Cell Phone Policy

Cell phone, pagers, and all electronic devices are not to be used in the classroom or clinical setting. In clinical all these items should be kept in the designated area, with all sounds turned off. In the classroom these items should be kept in your book bag or purse, with all sounds turned off. In an emergency a caller may use the College’s number 309-779-7700 and office staff will contact the student through the clinical/course faculty member. See “Cell Phone Policy” in the College Catalog.

Testing

Cell phones must be turned off during all exams and placed in your book bag or purse. If you cell phone sounds (rings or vibrates) during an exam, the book bag or purse will be collected by the faculty member, and you will receive a 10% point reduction of your final score of the exam. If the cell phone sounds and is in your pocket, the faculty member will collect the phone and you will receive a 10% point reduction of your final score on the exam for test review cell phones should be in your book bag or purse and turned off. Taking digital images of exams during a test or test review is strictly prohibited and is considered cheating. (See Academic Honesty and Integrity on page 32.)

Nursing Program Grading Scale

Grade Quality
Points
Value Significance
A 4.0 94-100 Excellent
B 3.0 86-93 Good
C 2.0 78-85 Satisfactory
D 1.0 70-77 Unsatisfactory
F 0 69-Below Failure
I     Incomplete
WP     Withdrawal Passing
WF     Withdrawal Failing
AU     Audit
R     Repeat
 

Clinical Grading

The nursing programs utilize a Pass/Fail system for clinical evaluation. The course Clinical Evaluation Tool delineates clinical outcomes and objectives that must be met by the end of the course. Students must meet all clinical objectives and outcomes to successfully complete a course. Failure to pass the clinical component of a course results in a grade of F regardless of the didactic score.

Clinical Contact Hour Description

In the Nursing programs, one clinical and/or laboratory semester hour of course credit will be presented as 48 contact hours of clinical/laboratory activity over the term of the course. For a semester- length course, one clinical/laboratory semester hour of credit requires three hours of clinical/laboratory activity per week for 16 weeks. Course faculty may offer individual schedule variations.

Standardized Testing

In order to support success on the NCLEX-RN, to improve test-taking skills, and to provide additional feedback on student academic progress, various standardized exams are scheduled in both ASN and BSN curricula. The test scores may be included as a portion of the appropriate final course grade.

Nursing Glossary of Terms

Differentiated Practice: a system of sorting roles, functions, and work of nurses according to education, clinical experience, and defined competence and decision-making skills required by different client needs and settings in which nursing is practiced. "Organizational process of defining nursing roles based on education, experience, and training.” Catalano, J. (2011). Nursing Now! Today's Issues, Tomorrow's Trends (6th ed.). Philadelphia: F.A. Davis Co.
 
Culturally Competent Nursing Care: "refers to the explicit use of culturally based care and health knowledge in sensitive, creative, and meaningful ways to fit the general lifeways and needs of individuals or groups for beneficial and meaningful health and well-being or to face illness, disabilities, or death." Leininger, M. & McFarland, M. (2002). Transcultural Nursing. Concepts, Theories, Research & Practice (3rd. ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill.
 
Human Care/Caring: "refers to the abstract and manifest phenomena with expressions of assistive, supportive, enabling, and facilitating ways to help self or others with evident or anticipated needs to improve health, a human condition, or a lifeway or to face disabilities or dying." Leininger, M. & McFarland, M. (2002). Transcultural Nursing: Concepts, Theories, Research & Practice (3rd. ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill.

Code for Nurses

© American Nurses Association, 2001
 
  1. The nurse, in all professional relationships, practices with compassion and respect for the inherent dignity, worth and uniqueness of every individual, unrestricted by considerations of social or economic status, personal attributes, or the nature of health problems.
  2. The nurse's primary commitment is to the patient, whether an individual, family, group, or community.
  3. The nurse promotes, advocates for, and strives to protect the health, safety, and rights of the patient.
  4. The nurse is responsible and accountable for individual nursing practice and determines the appropriate delegation of tasks consistent with the nurse's obligation to provide optimum patient care.
  5. The nurse owes the same duties to self as to others, including the responsibility to preserve integrity and safety, to maintain competence, and to continue personal and professional growth.
  6. The nurse participates in establishing, maintaining, and improving health care environments and conditions of employment conducive to the provision of quality health care and consistent with the values of the profession through individual and collective action.
  7. The nurse participates in the advancement of the profession through contributions to practice, education, administration, and knowledge development.
  8. The nurse collaborates with other health professionals and the public in promoting community, national, and international efforts to meet health needs.
  9. The profession of nursing, as represented by associations and their members, is responsible for articulating nursing values, for maintaining the integrity of the profession and its practice, and for shaping social policy.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE NURSING BSN-A PROGRAM CURRICULUM PLAN

Upon acceptance, 52 credits of approved general education prerequisite requirements will be awarded toward the BSN degree.
SUMMER SEMESTER
Session 1: 6 weeks
Course #: Description: Semester Hours
NURA101 The Art and Science of Nursing Practice 7 SH
Session II: 7 weeks
NURA102 Adult Health Nursing 9 SH
NURA212 Pharmacology I 1 SH
TOTAL 17 SH
FALL SEMESTER
16 weeks
NUR200 Human Disease Processes 3 SH
NUR201 Life Span Nursing I 9 SH
NUR302 Advanced Health Assessment 3 SH
NUR411 Nursing Research 3 SH
TOTAL 18 SH
SPRING SEMESTER
16 weeks
NUR202 Life Span Nursing II 8 SH
NUR203 Maternal-Newborn Nursing 4 SH
NURA213 Pharmacology I 1 SH
NUR303 Nursing Pathophysiology 3 SH
NUR410 Transcultural Nursing 3 SH
TOTAL 19 SH
SUMMER SEMESTER
Session I: 6 weeks
NURA301 Nursing Leadership & Management 4 SH
NURA401 Nursing in the Community 4 SH
Session II: 7 weeks
NUR402 Professional Issues in Nursing 3 SH
NURA420 Senior Seminar 4 SH
TOTAL 15 SH
All general education prerequisites must be completed prior to admission to the Accelerated BSN Program.
All natural science courses must have been taken within the past seven years
 Transfer credit evaluated on a course by course basis.


Pre-Requisite General Education Total 52 SH
Nursing Total 69 SH
BSN-Accelerated Program Total 121 SH
 

A MINIMUM OF 35 SEMESTER HOURS OF PROGRAM MAJOR COURSES MUST BE COMPLETEDAT TRINITY COLLEGE OF NURSING & HEALTH SCIENCES TO MEET GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING BSN-B PROGRAM CURRICULUM PLAN


Upon acceptance, 52 credits of approved general education prerequisite requirements will be awarded toward the BSN degree.

FIRST YEAR
Fall Semester: 16 weeks
Course #: Description: Semester Hours
NUR101 The Art and Science of Nursing Practice 8 SH
NUR410 Transcultural Nursing 3 SH
Total 11 SH
*Students may take one general education course, with the exception of A+PI, A+PII or microbiology, to maintain full-time enrollment is the first semester 3-4 semester hours (14-15) SH
Spring Semester: 16 weeks
NUR102 Adult Health Nursing 9 SH
NUR212 Pharmacology I 1 SH
NUR402 Professional Issues in Nursing 3 SH
Total 13 SH
Summer Semester
NUR302 Advanced Health Assessment 3 SH
NUR411 Nursing Research 3 SH
Total 6 SH
SECOND YEAR
Fall Semester: 16 weeks
NUR200 Human Disease Processes 3 SH
NUR201 Life Span Nursing I 9 SH
NUR401 Community Health Nursing 4 SH
Total 16 SH
Spring Semester: 16 weeks
NUR202 Life Span Nursing II 8 SH
NUR203 Maternal-Newborn Nursing 4 SH
NUR303 Nursing Pathophysiology 3 SH
NURA213 Pharmacology II 1 SH
Total 16 SH
Session 1: 6 weeks
NURA301 Nursing Leadership & Management 4 SH
Session II: 7 weeks
NURA420 Senior Seminar 4 SH
Total 8 SH


One general education course from the prerequisite list may be taken during the first semester in order to be a full time student. This course may not include Anatomy & Physiology I, Anatomy and Physiology II, or Microbiology. These courses must be taken before admission to the program.
 
Pre-Requisite General Education Total 52 SH
Nursing Total 70 SH
Total 122 SH
 
 
A MINIMUM OF 35 SEMESTER HOURS OF PROGRAM MAJOR COURSES MUST BE COMPLETEDAT TRINITY COLLEGE OF NURSING & HEALTH SCIENCES TO MEET GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING BSN-C PROGRAM CURRICULUM PLAN


Upon acceptance, 71 credits will be awarded with evidence of graduation from a regionally accredited program and proof of licensure from a state board of nursing
THIRD YEAR
Fall Semester: 16 weeks
Course #: Description: Semester Hours
NUR301 Nursing Leadership & Management 3 SH
  English Comp II6 3 SH
NUR302 Advanced Health Assessment4 3 SH
  Ethics 1,2 3 SH
TOTAL    12 SH
Spring Semester: 16 weeks
NUR303 Pathophysiology 2 3 SH
NUR320 Nursing Informatics 3 SH
  Anthropology 1,2 3 SH
  Advanced Science 2 4 SH
TOTAL 13 SH
FOURTH YEAR
Fall Semester: 16 weeks
NUR403 Community Health Nursing 4 SH
NUR411 Nursing Research4 3 SH
NUR413 Gerontological Nursing 3 SH
  Statistics 2 3 SH
TOTAL 13 SH
Spring Semester: 16 weeks
NUR402 NUR 402 Professional Issues in Nursing4 3 SH
NUR410 NUR 410 Transcultural Nursing4 3 SH
NUR412 Genetics and Genomics 3 SH
  Humanities Elective 1, 3 3 SH
NUR420 Senior Seminar5 1 SH
TOTAL 13 SH
1 Indicates course may be chosen from among approved clusters listed in the academic section of the College Catalog/Handbook
2 General education courses are taken at another institution or transferred into the nursing major, and may be completed prior to or concurrent with nursing courses
3 Humanities courses are selected from African-American studies, art, communication, English, foreign language, literature, history, philosophy, religious studies, & theater
4 Also offered with BSN-A & BSN-B curriculums (See BSN-A & BSN-B curriculum plans)
5 Offered every term (including summer)
6 Must be a co or prerequisite to the first nursing course

 
General Education Total 19 SH
Nursing Total 32 SH
Advanced Standing Total 71 SH
BSN-Completion Program Total 122 SH
 
 
A MINIMUM OF 19 SEMESTER HOURS OF PROGRAM MAJOR COURSES MUST BE COMPLETED AT TRINITY COLLEGE OF NURSING & HEALTH SCIENCES TO MEET GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS